The Olympic Games

The upcoming Olympic Games in 2021 and 2022 each have a unique set of human rights risks and opportunities. Top of mind in Tokyo are LGBTI rights, health risks, and physical and sexual abuse of children. Beijing brings a host of issues with freedom of expression, privacy, media rights, labor standards, and crimes against humanity.

Take a look at our latest research and analysis to learn how the SRA and its partners are making a difference.

Japan: Introduce LGBT Equality Act Before Olympics

116 Groups Urge Prime Minister Suga to Take Action

China: Repression Threatens Winter Olympics

The Chinese government’s heightened repression from Xinjiang to Hong Kong threatens its hosting of the 2022 Winter Olympics, Human Rights Watch said today in a letter to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach. The Beijing Winter Olympics are scheduled to begin on February 4, 2022.

World Players Welcomes Expert Findings that IOC Must Embed Athlete, Human and Labour Rights within Olympic Movement

The World Players Association today welcomed the far reaching recommendations by former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Prince Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, and Shift Vice President, Rachel Davis, that the Olympic Movement must acknowledge its responsibilities towards athletes’ internationally recognized human rights and basic dignity. The recommendations require the IOC to embed and implement the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) if it […]

Japan: Child Abuse in Pursuit of Olympic Medals

Host of 2021 Summer Games Should Undertake Urgent Systemic Reforms (Tokyo) – Child athletes in Japan suffer physical, sexual, and verbal abuse when training for sport, Human Rights Watch said in a new report, released today, that documents depression, suicides, physical disabilities, and lifelong trauma resulting from the abuse. Japan will host the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics beginning July […]

China 2022: IOC Should Uphold Human Rights

Planning for the 2022 Olympics needs to address key human rights issues, the Sport & Rights Alliance said today. While Beijing’s May 2020 “Sustainability Plan” refers to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the document remains silent on human rights, labor standards, freedom of expression and association, LGBTI rights, media and internet freedom, rights to peaceful assembly and of association, transparency and anti-corruption.

Letter: Adoption of an 8th Fundamental Principle of Olympism on Human Rights

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has now had more than four years to fully assess and understand its corporate responsibility to respect human rights in line with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGP). It is well past time for the IOC to commit to upholding respect for human rights and now implement this responsibility throughout the IOC’s entire enterprise and supply chain.