Sporting Events

In the next two years, the world will experience a mega-sporting event season like no other, with two Olympics, two World Cups, and a host of other competitions that have the potential to either elevate or trample internationally recognized human rights.

Explore our latest research and analysis on the world’s biggest sporting events and the athletes, fans, and communities impacted by them.

China 2022: IOC Should Uphold Human Rights

Planning for the 2022 Olympics needs to address key human rights issues, the Sport & Rights Alliance said today. While Beijing’s May 2020 “Sustainability Plan” refers to the UN Sustainable Development Goals, the document remains silent on human rights, labor standards, freedom of expression and association, LGBTI rights, media and internet freedom, rights to peaceful assembly and of association, transparency and anti-corruption.

Requirements for Human Rights, Labour Rights, Anti-Corruption and Stakeholder Involvement for Asian Cup 2027 Bidding Procedure

As the AFC prepares for the close of bids for the 2027 Asian Cup, the SRA would like to know what have been the mitigation measures already taken by the AFC to ensure that human rights are fully respected in the bidding for, as well as organization and delivery of, this event.

Sport & Rights Alliance Backs Human Rights Advisory Board Call for FIFA to be Accountable on Human Rights

FIFA should back its 2017 Human Rights Policy by ensuring accountability, transparency and remedy at the highest levels of football, a landmark report by FIFA’s independent human rights advisory board has recommended.

Letter: Adoption of an 8th Fundamental Principle of Olympism on Human Rights

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has now had more than four years to fully assess and understand its corporate responsibility to respect human rights in line with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGP). It is well past time for the IOC to commit to upholding respect for human rights and now implement this responsibility throughout the IOC’s entire enterprise and supply chain.

Letter to the IOC: Adobe an Eighth Fundamental Principle of Olympism

As we’ve seen time and time again over this last year through cases of unimaginable abuse, gender and racial discrimination, silencing of athlete voices, threats to athlete safety and wellbeing, and restrictions on athletes’ ability to make a living – the ever changing and often arbitrary rules of sport continue to supersede the rights of athletes. Until the IOC places a priority on human rights within its policy framework and above all else, its Olympic Charter, this will continue to be the case.

Letter: International Olympic Committee “Athletes’ Rights and Responsibilities Declaration”

Dr. Thomas BachPresidentInternational Olympic CommitteeAv Général-Guisan 701009 PullySwitzerland October 2, 2018 Dear President Bach, It has come to our attention that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) may adopt the now titled “The Athletes’ Rights and Responsibilities Declaration (Athletes’ Declaration)” this week at the 133rd IOC Session in Buenos Aires. While we support the intent of […]